Fort McKavett State Historic Site

Reenactors raise the US flag. The fort ruins at night. Soldier reenactors. Kids play games on the grounds.

7066 FM 864 
Fort McKavett, TX 76841
GPS: N30° 49' 28.2" W100° 6' 37.8"
325-396-2358
ft-mckavett@thc.state.tx.us

 

Driving map to Fort McKavett.

Standing atop a windswept remote hill, the remains of a 150-year-old West Texas fort beckon curious visitors to the site that is now considered one of the best preserved and most intact examples of a Texas Indian Wars (1850–1875) military post. Take in the spectacular Hill Country vistas and experience early West Texas life through the real stories of the infantrymen, Buffalo Soldiers, women, and children who lived at what Gen. William T. Sherman once described as "the prettiest post in Texas."

Restored structures include the officers’ quarters, barracks, hospital, school house, dead house, sink, and post headquarters. In addition, there are ruins of several buildings, most notably the commanding officer’s quarters, which burned in 1941, and the barracks along the north side of the parade ground, which once was the longest building west of the Mississippi River.

Upcoming Events

June 11

Busy Hands: Historic Trades

Witness as Fort McKavett becomes home to a variety of period tradesmen as they ply their trade. From blacksmithing to basket weaving, experience how Victorian-era craftsmen created products before assembly lines and automation. See the Fort...

July 2

Independence Day at Fort McKavett

Join us for the 140th anniversary of the U.S. Centennial Celebration at Fort McKavett, and celebrate exactly how they would have 140 years ago! 

We will be running the same events that the soldiers and officers participated in back in 1876...

July 9

Old Stories, New Voices Youth Camp - Fort McKavett

In partnership with the Texas State Historic Association (TSHA), Fort McKavett plays host annually to this spectacular event—a camp for 4th-6th graders from metropolitan areas around Texas, which brings them out to experience history first hand...

From the Blog